Canada: ‘police state’ tactics used against children

A twelve year-old boy became upset after being told he would be getting a needle, and threatened unspecified damage to the school if he was assaulted in this manner.

I remember a time when the boy’s father would have been called in from work, and would have straightened the boy out and told him to behave himself and act like a man.  Instead, here is how the school and police responded:

“We just wanted to send a strong message to everyone out there … that this will not be tolerated in schools,” Durham police spokesman Dave Selby said Wednesday. “We want to let people know that under the Criminal Code, if there is behaviour that warrants it, we will be laying a charge.

“Following the midday incident, a letter, in which principal Todd Bishop informed parents of the incident and actions taken by staff, was sent home with students.

“(Police) officers responded quickly and, after conducting a search, they confirmed that there were no weapons at the school, and that students were safe” the letter stated.

Blowing things up out of all proportion?  You bet.

Intimidating to all pupils and their parents, not just the ‘accused’?  You bet.

Unacceptable ‘overkill’ behaviour by the police under the circumstances?  You bet.

Canadian police in general are getting a little too good at acting like politically correct ‘Gauleiters’, even with children, and the sooner parents and concerned citizens protest the better, in my opinion.

Jeff Goodall

Threatening charge laid against Bowmanville student upset over hep B shot 

Durhamregion.com

Jeff Mitchell: Nov. 24th, 2010 

Boy, 12, was held for bail hearing 

BOWMANVILLE — A 12-year-old Bowmanville student who became upset after he discovered he was to receive a needle Tuesday was arrested on a charge of threatening and was held for a bail hearing.

No one was hurt and no weapons were found at Ross Tilley Public School, Durham police said. A school board spokeswoman said the boy threatened to cause damage to the school building.

“We just wanted to send a strong message to everyone out there … that this will not be tolerated in schools,” Durham police spokesman Dave Selby said Wednesday. “We want to let people know that under the Criminal Code, if there is behaviour that warrants it, we will be laying a charge.”

Officers charged the boy after consulting with the Crown Attorney’s office, Mr. Selby said.

Police said the boy became upset when he learned he was to receive a hepatitis B shot. When school staff spoke to the boy, he threatened to cause damage to the school, police said.

The boy was charged and after police spoke to his family, he was held for a bail hearing.

Judy Malfara, a spokeswoman for the Kawartha Pine Ridge District School Board, said staff contacted police out of concern for other students, who were within earshot when the alleged threats were made.

“The student made several general threats, not against specific individuals, but about damage to the school itself,” Ms. Malfara said.

“With any kinds of threats, we do involve the police. Fortunately it’s rare, but even one is too many.

“Student safety is the first priority,” she said.

Following the midday incident, a letter, in which principal Todd Bishop informed parents of the incident and actions taken by staff, was sent home with students.

“(Police) officers responded quickly and, after conducting a search, they confirmed that there were no weapons at the school, and that students were safe,” the letter stated.

The decision to charge and hold the student was made at the discretion of police, Ms. Malfara said. She added the student is not currently at the school.

The boy, whose name is protected under the Youth Criminal Justice Act, was charged with a single count of threatening.

See original here.

See Toronto Sun story here.

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