School segregation not the answer

“We’re pleased for students and parents that the existing program at the Africentric Alternative School is doing well, but any school can be made to work if enough resources are thrown at it.

“Dealing effectively with the high black drop-out rate involves both blacks and whites — and everyone else — acknowledging uncomfortable truths.”

In my opinion, the one ‘uncomfortable truth’ that won’t be addressed, by the Toronto School Board or by any government agency or political party, is the significantly lower average IQ of blacks as compared to whites.

This particular truth is intractable, and is found consistently throughout the world, in majority-black countries as well as minority-black.

The difference in cognitive abilities renders the absorption of black immigrants into Canada, or any other white society, difficult and disruptive as well as ultimately impossible. The creation of a permanent sub-class of often criminally-minded unemployables is inevitable, together with all the social and financial costs in terms of welfare services, policing, medical care, incarceration, and a sharp lowering of the quality of life for the rest of us.

Large parts of Toronto are already third-world cess-pools, with public housing ghettos in which drugs and crime reign supreme, shootings are common, residents refuse to co-operate with the police, and the white people who pay the freight are regarded as the enemy.

Skirmishing with the symptoms of low IQ will not help to resolve the underlying problem.

Jeff Goodall

Africentric schools won’t fix issue 

Toronto Sun

Editorial: April 2nd, 2011 

Launching a bad idea badly is an inexcusable mistake for a publicly funded school board.

It’s hard to imagine how the Toronto school board’s now-aborted plan to open an Africentric (black-focused) high school at Oakwood Collegiate this fall, with no community consultation, could have been handled in a worse way.

School board director Chris Spence admitted to the Sun’s Moira MacDonald it may have been his worst week since he took the job. “It didn’t work,” he said. “As director, the buck stops with me.”

Did the emotions on all sides of this issue aroused three years ago when trustees approved the city’s first public Africentric elementary school in Downsview after two years of community consultation, slip everyone’s mind?

Whenever this high school issue comes back before the board — and it will — suspicions in whatever community is chosen that the fix is already in, no matter what the merits or demerits of the proposal, will run high.

Good luck trying to calm down that looming confrontation, now that this precedent has been set.

All of which is a good reason for stopping the process in its tracks.

The appalling 40% drop-out rate among black (and other) students, is not going to be solved by having a few, token Africentric schools.

We’re pleased for students and parents that the existing program at the Africentric Alternative School is doing well, but any school can be made to work if enough resources are thrown at it.

The problem is symbolic victories in attacking the drop-out rate are merely that — symbolic.

Already, the controversy over a few Africentric schools is taking attention away from the real issue — lowering drop-out rates across the system.

We don’t agree with critics who charge Africentric schools are a throwback to segregation, as these schools are being requested by some black parents, not imposed by whites on blacks in order to ship them off to inferior facilities.

But the fact Africentric schools aren’t racist, doesn’t mean they’re a good idea.

Every time they’re discussed, they divide students and parents of all colours, instead of uniting them in the common cause of improving public education for all.

Dealing effectively with the high black drop-out rate involves both blacks and whites — and everyone else — acknowledging uncomfortable truths.

Black parents have to accept the breakdown of the family unit in their community contributes directly to high failure rates and a lack of discipline.

White parents have to acknowledge racism and poverty exist, and contribute to high failure rates, as well.

Everyone has to realize that in a diverse city like Toronto, trotting out special schools for those of a particular race, ethnicity or colour not only won’t work, it ill serves our society.

Going forward, let’s hear less from this board about Africentric schools and more about how to help the thousands of low-achieving students, of all colours, whom the status quo is failing.

See original here.

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