“Blood & Honour”: More class than the Calgary Police

The reaction of local residents to the distribution of leaflets by ‘Blood and Honour” is just a little too ‘precious’.

“Forest Lawn resident Regina John was at first outraged by the sight. Then she cried.”   Well, really.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with saying that immigration costs us financially, or suggesting that immigration should be geared to Canada`s needs bearing in mind our unemployment rate.

And yet one ‘offended’ person is an “English as a second language” schoolteacher who says that she will likely raise the issue with her students when classes resume next week: “A lot of them don’t know the warning signs, who to watch out for or that there’s even racism in Canada… They think Canada doesn’t have racism.”

How condescending.

And, it is interesting to see how Calgary’s police take it upon themselves to provide political guidance:  “(Const. Brian Denison of the police hate crimes unit) said the posters are not illegal and do not contain anything for which their writers would be prosecuted under current hate-crime legislation.”  But he has no hesitation in recommending residents tear them down, as in “I would not leave that up on a street post in front of my house”.

Perhaps Constable Denison is unclear as to his function in society…

On September 11th 2001, (yes, that September 11th), I ìnterviewed Constable Doug Jones of the Calgary Police by phone. I had intended to use the interview as the basis for a “Canada Free Press” article, but that never happened for a variety of reasons, including what happened later that day. However, I still have the notes which I took as he and I spoke.

When I suggested to him that the police are functioning as “enforcers for an experiment in social engineering” he responded that “Diversity is a good thing”. He also said that Whites will be a minority in Calgary by 2020.

I asked him if he thought that this impending minority-hood was a good thing, and he replied that there is “One race, and that`s the human race…the sooner people understand and accept that the better off they`ll be.”

And to quote from my notes, he also made an implication that “people who are not comfortable with diversity may react and this has to be dealt with as diversity is a good thing.”

According to the introductory page of the “Blood and Honour” (actually “28Canada”) website, “The following webpage deals with mature and often controversial subject matter of a political nature. If you are easily offended, under the age of majority, or in a country where such content is deemed illegal, we would recommend not viewing this site.”

Under “Announcements” they also have this to say:  “Keep in mind that while we at Blood & Honour Canada don’t care what method you use to put them (leaflets -JG) up, the police might, so to avoid any legal troubles on our part we ask that you work within the laws and by-laws of your city when pasting them up. So as much as glue or flour & water (wheatpaste) are exceptionally effective, cheap, and efficient, we ask that you spend your hard-earned money on tape so that the cops and ‘Anti-White’ organizations can remove them with relatively no effort.”

In my opinion, “Blood and Honour” displays far more class than the Calgary police.

Jeff Goodall. 

White supremacists recruiting in Calgary

Toronto Sun

Michael Wood: July 30th, 2011

CALGARY – Emotions are running high in Forest Lawn where a group with ties to known white supremacists seems intent on recruiting like-minded people through a poster campaign.

The black-and-white posters, with statements like “Immigration costs Canadian taxpayers $23 billion annually” coupled with statistics purporting to reflect Canadian immigration and unemployment, have been glued to bus stations, light standards and telephone poles throughout the southeast neighbourhood.

At the bottom, the words “Does this seem right to you?” are followed by “If not, contact.”

A phone number and e-mail address are printed, along with the website to the international white supremacist group known as Blood and Honour.

“I think it’s disgusting that people have the audacity,” said Donna Clarke, a teacher with the Calgary Immigrant Educational Society that operates a stone’s throw from where several posters were spotted on Friday.

The campaign is a concern for staff at the society, where some 300 new immigrants, many of whom live in Forest Lawn, are learning English.

Clarke said she and other teachers will likely raise the issue with students when classes resume next week.

“A lot of them don’t know the warning signs, who to watch out for or that there’s even racism in Canada,” she said.

“They think Canada doesn’t have racism.”

Forest Lawn resident Regina John was at first outraged by the sight. Then she cried.

“It’s just not right,” she said. “We won’t stand for this.”

Others, like William Baker, feel the same way.

He’s already ripped one down from a bus stop.

“It’s just hateful and it’s just creating more problems,” Baker said.

It’s not the first time such posters have been plastered throughout Forest Lawn. Just last year, residents awoke to dozens plastered throughout their community.

“They’re doing the same thing they’ve been doing for several years,” said Const. Brian Denison of the police hate crimes unit.

Denison said the posters are not illegal and do not contain anything for which their writers would be prosecuted under current hate-crime legislation.

That doesn’t mean residents have to leave them up.

“I would not leave that up on a street post in front of my house,” Denison said.

See original here

Visit the `28canada`website here.

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