Human Rights Commissions target the Bible

“Canada’s human rights censors aren’t declaring war on hate. They are declaring war on Christianity. Scratch a human rights commission, find an anti-Christian bigot.”

Defending free speech

Because we believe in a society where freedom is more important than hurt feelings.

The Toronto Sun
Ezra Levant: Oct. 16th, 2011

Bill Whatcott doesn’t like homosexuality. 

A few years ago, that point of view would be called “mainstream.” In fact, until the 1960s, homosexuality was a crime in the Criminal Code. That’s been amended.

But there is another book out there, called the Holy Bible, that is equally critical of homosexuality.

It hasn’t been amended yet, and some people still believe in it.

That’s called freedom of religion.

Whatcott doesn’t quietly believe homosexuality is wrong.

He’s noisy about it. He hands out literature on the subject.

He’s not diplomatic; some of his flyers are downright rude.

But he’s always peaceful. Whatcott has never called for or committed violence.

What Bill Whatcott is doing is expressing himself.

He’s upset about things — about a sexual practice he disagrees with, and the political acceptance of it.

But he’s going about his disagreement in a very Canadian way — peacefully protesting about it.

But that’s illegal in Saskatchewan, under section 14 of their human rights law, which reads in part:

“No person shall publish or display … on any lands or premises or in a newspaper, through … television or radio … or in any printed matter … or by means of any other medium … including any notice, sign, symbol, emblem, article, statement of other representation tending or likely to tend to deprive, abridge or otherwise restrict the enjoyment by any person … of any right … or that exposes or tends to expose to hatred, ridicules, belittles or otherwise affronts the dignity of any person …”

That’s a massive, vague and subjective limit on free speech. And it limits Whatcott’s freedom of religion, too.

What mature society makes it illegal to “affront” someone’s “dignity”? That’s how kindergarten teachers treat their children. But this law applies to adults. This law makes it illegal to “likely” cause someone to feel the emotion of hatred.

If that’s all it took to wipe out the human emotion of hate — a natural emotion that is part of a normal personality — then we could just pass the Love Each Other Act and be done with it. But people don’t work that way.

Turning anger into violence is wrong — and we have a Criminal Code and real police to deal with that.

But simply being mad isn’t a crime. And neither is saying words that are mad. In fact, that’s blowing off steam — it’s a safety valve.

Countries that don’t let you blow off steam peacefully, through mere words, are exactly the places where people are so frustrated they turn to violence. Think of the Arab world.

Human rights censorship laws are so vague, they become nothing more than the expression of the personal whims of the human rights commission enforcers. It’s quite revealing. Canadian censors have persecuted Mark Harding, a Christian pastor concerned about Islam being taught in public schools.

Human rights commissions have gone after Father Alphonse de Valk, a 70-something Catholic priest in Toronto.

They investigated Calgary Bishop Fred Henry because he wrote a pastoral letter against gay marriage.

They hunted down the Christian Heritage Party. They convicted Rev. Stephen Boissoin of Red Deer, Alta., and subjected him to a lifetime ban on giving public sermons, or even writing private e-mails, criticizing gay marriage. The conviction was overturned in 2009.

What do these victims have in common? Pastor, priest, reverend, bishop, Christian party. Canada’s human rights censors aren’t declaring war on hate. They are declaring war on Christianity. Scratch a human rights commission, find an anti-Christian bigot.

That’s Bill Whatcott’s crime: He believes the Bible, which these kangaroo courts regard as hate literature. It’s time the Supreme Court ended this politically abusive censorship. It’s time the Canadian government treated free speech with respect. Not because we necessarily support Bill Whatcott or what he says.

But because we believe in a society where freedom is more important than hurt feelings.
 
See original here.

See my “Persecution of Christians” category here.